Elbow & Forearm

  Elbow & Forearm

Little League Elbow

This syndrome is characterized by either medial or lateral elbow pain that is commonly found in adolescent baseball pitchers due to the repetitive throwing overhand movements with the elbow/forearm. The mechanism of this injury is caused by overstretching of the inside structures of the elbow in conjunction with compression of outside structures around the elbow. ...

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Nursemaid’s Elbow & Radial head dislocations

Nursemaid’s elbow is referred to an injury on the outside of the elbow as a result of swinging a child by their arms or from a sudden jerking of the child’s arm. This injury most frequently affects children between the ages of 2-4 years old. The end of the radius bone is called the radial ...

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Triceps Tendinitis (Posterior Tennis Elbow)

A tendon is a fibrous cord of connective tissue connecting muscle to bone. Made up of mostly collagen, it has more tensile strength than muscles but far less elasticity. Due to this inelasticity, overuse of tendons commonly leads to inflammation and swelling causing pain. The triceps brachii muscle attaches to the back of the humerus ...

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Olecranon Bursitis

A bursa is a closed, fluid-filled sac that functions as a cushion and gliding surface to reduce friction between tissues of the body. Olecranon bursitis is a result of inflammation of the bursa located at the back of the elbow. It is often a result of a traumatic injury or direct blow to the bursa ...

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Medial Epicondylitis (Golfer’s Elbow)

The medial epicondyle is the most prominent part on the inside of theelbow. The purpose of the medial epicondyle is to serve as an anchor point for muscles that move the wrist and fingers. This can commonly be overloaded during repetitive sports e.g. tennis or golf or occupational activities e.g. using a mouse or a ...

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Lateral Epicondylitis (Tennis Elbow)

The lateral epicondyle is the most prominent part on the outside of the elbow. The purpose of the lateral epicondyle is to serve as an anchor point for muscles that move the wrist and fingers. This can commonly be overloaded during repetitive sports e.g. tennis or occupational activities e.g. using a mouse or a screwdriver. ...

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